News & Events to Inspire STEAM Education

Enabling the Space Economy a workshop with Rich Phillips Strategic Business Growth Consultant | Countdown to ISDC 2014

Enabling the Space Economy a workshop with Rich Phillips Strategic Business Growth Consultant | Countdown to ISDC 2014

May 10, 2014

Rich Philips is one of the Track Co-Chairs of the Space Enterprise Track at the ISDC National Space Society conference coming up just around the corner in Los Angeles less than 5 days away May 14-18. Rich is founder of Phillips & Company a global communications firm serving both emerging and established leaders in the markets that are changing our world such as the commercial space market, homeland security, mobile computing, education, healthcare and energy. In 2007 Rich launched his space practice at Phillips & Company and has been working with companies in the space economy for many years now. The Space Enterprise track will address business plans, projects, and concepts that have reasonable potential within 10 years to become profitable and offer a competitive return to investors. QGITS had the opportunity to chat with Rich and hear more about what he had to say about the emerging new space economy.

curiosity_drilling_mars2
An artist’s concept of Curiosity Mars Rover examining a rock on Mars with a set of tools that can pick up samples of soil. – Courtesy NASA

QGITS: What are some of the topics that will be discussed on the Space Enterprise track?

Rich Phillips: It’s very important that we recognize the space economy is real, it’s here today and we will be focusing on opportunities for investors and entrepreneurs to grow and to be financially successful. We will see opportunities within the next 10 years that will have a return on investment. So we are looking at very near term, we put together a two day program that will explore opportunities for growth and success in a very near term space economy. We are also going to do something very unique on the 2nd day. We are going to break out as a group to conduct workshops designed to identify the requirements for a space economy to exist. Markets exists because of certain forces: legal, policy, economic, & technology. In order for a market to exist it needs to be sustainable on its own. It can’t be funded entirely by government it can’t be funded by any one mission, a true space economy needs to be multi-mission, multi- product and multi-service. So what conditions are necessary for a market to exist? We are going to explore that question and produce an answer amongst the leaders in the room. It’s a unique opportunity I think to bring together leaders in space entrepreneurship on the investment financial services side of space to really tackle these core issues. Once we defined what the requirements are we can begin working to make sure those requirements exist in order to continue to grow the space economy and achieve what we want for this country and the world.

austin_team_1280 (1)In photo: Rich Phillips (front left) with his team with one of the Get Curious campaign “rocks.” Phillips & Company coordinated with Explore Mars and other firms vested in the advancement of space exploration, including NASA, Boeing, United Launch Alliance, AeroJet and National Geographic.

QGITS: One of the innovative companies Phillips & Company is working with is Mars World Enterprises. How is the new emerging space economy becoming an opportunity for businesses like Mars World?

Richard Phillips: I believe that space is a platform for experiences, applications and services. And I believe that in this economy, people buy experiences they just don’t buy products and services. I think the Mars World concept is designed to create an immersive experience for those here on earth to be part of something very special that will transform the way we think about space and ultimately I think Mars World has a very good chance of redefining the way that entertainment and theme entertainment is produced.

QGITS: Is there anything else you would like to express about the space economy?

Rich Phillips: I believe that exploration is critical to prosperity and human progress and ultimately the space economy is an opportunity for us to really be truly ourselves as human beings. Human beings were destined to explore. I don’t think there is anything different between the first people who discovered the semi conductor, the first people who had the innovation to build that first computer or to really create the first internet application and those that are now looking at space and saying what can we do there. That’s exciting to me not just because of the destination but because of the platform for human expression and human prosperity.

More Latest ISDC News & Updates: Apollo 11 astronaut and author Buzz Aldrin, the second man to set foot on the Moon, will speak during a luncheon Saturday May 18th. A total of six astronauts will be attending the conference. The 33rd Annual International Space Development Conference (ISDC 2014) kicks off on Wednesday, May 14, for five days of presentations, panels, exhibits, lunches and dinners celebrating this year’s theme, “A Space Renaissance.”

space banner

Register Here

Space & Media Track: Ted Schilowitz Innovator & Futurist speaking on “The Future Is Immersion” | Countdown to ISDC 2014

Space & Media Track: Ted Schilowitz Innovator & Futurist speaking on “The Future Is Immersion” | Countdown to ISDC 2014

May 6, 2014

Innovator and futurist Ted Schilowitz founding team member & first employee of Red Camera Co and consultant for digital cinema technology company Barco and 20th Century Fox. Ted will be speaking at this year’s Space and Media Track at the ISDC National Space Conference along with a list of scheduled speakers in segments encompassing movies & television, social media, art & books, games, simulations, news, filming in space, classroom, and music. QGITS was excited to hear what Ted Schilowitz had to say about his upcoming talk “The Future Is Immersion.” The ISDC countdown is just 8 days away for the conference to be held in Los Angeles at the Sheraton LAX May 14-18.

Ted Schilowitz Escape

QGITS: How did you earn the title futurist-consigliere?

Ted Schilowitz: It comes from the radical nature of my career, I’m one of the founding members and 1st employee of a movie camera company called Red Digital Cinema. Red has become very much a force in the motion picture world and it’s been a main stream tool for making movies. When I started, it was just me and Jim Jannard putting it all together and then it blew up into something significant. My title early on was “Leader of the Rebellion.” That was kind of an interesting moniker to establish in what we were doing by being very radical and very disruptive in a space that was right for disruption. Years later once the rebellion was well in hand, I had to change the business card title and it just said “insert title here” that just drove the press crazy. I retired from Red about 9 months ago, it was a very short lived retirement because one of my friends who is one of the studio heads at Fox, who used the Red camera quite a bit, essentially asked me to help look around the next corner of technology and all the things it means from a storytelling stand point. We had to come up with a title that would reflect that and not be some sort of business title. So the studio said that I was here to look at the future so we should call you “futurist” and you’re here to be our “consigliere” to the future and advise us. Since I was bold enough to stand up in meetings, have the courage and say what I think, that’s why the studio wanted me there, so they put on my business card “futurist-consigliere” which of course gives everybody a little chuckle, it’s nothing more than that, it’s just funny.

QGITS: Your presentation talk at the ISDC conference will be on “The Future is Immersion” can you talk a little bit about that?

Ted Schilowitz: I will be talking about the learning and the exploration of forms, functions and how it relates to the field of motion pictures entertainment and what that means and how it’s changing. Also what’s important and what’s around the next corner. I am involved in a number of these efforts and what I believed is the next generation of cinema which is a project called “Escape” which I am doing with a company called Barco, the worldwide leader in cinema projection. We have created an experience extending the vision of cinema around you. I have another fun and interesting title at Barco called “CinemaVangelist.” I also have a very high interest in virtual reality which is an extension of this visual experience to have a personalized vision of the future with a headset on you. So my talk will be pieces and parts of that and an understanding of form, function and a future.

oculus

QGITS: What were your thoughts when asked to be a part of the ISDC Conference Space & Media Track added this year?

Ted Schilotwitz: I’m thrilled to be a part of it, I am a huge space fan. I grew up in central Florida so I am a child of the space generation and have been enamored with it since I was a little kid. I track this stuff, I know a lot about it, I love the excitement and the exploration of it. I was thrilled when asked to be a part of the conference in some fashion to talk about my vision of the future and how it relates to entertainment and storytelling. I can’t wait to meet all the other people that are speaking and talking, I’m sure they are going to have wonderful things to say and stories that are going to get me all excited about space all over again.

About the National Space Society: The NSS has over 50 chapters around the world with conferences held in major cities and venues throughout the United States that covers several broad areas of study related to building a spacefaring civilization, including transportation to and through space, technology needed to live and work in space and Earth based activities to advocate for or educate others about space development. The ISDC is unique in that it brings together members of the general public with space activists, scientists, engineers, educators, astronauts, aerospace industry leaders, entrepreneurs, artists and government officials for one purpose: to explore humanity’s future in space.

space banner

Register Here

NASA Space Exploration Track: Lunar Sub-Track Managed by Dave Dunlop | Countdown to ISDC 2014

NASA Space Exploration Track: Lunar Sub-Track Managed by Dave Dunlop | Countdown to ISDC 2014

Apr 29, 2014

The countdown continues for this year’s upcoming ISDC National Space Society conference held in Los Angeles at the Sheraton Hotel LAX May 14-18. Dave Dunlop will be presenting and managing Track Chair of the Lunar Sub-Track during the NASA Exploration session. Dave has been part of the International Committee of the National Space Society in partner with other organizations that share the same vision of a future in which the free enterprise human economy expands to include settlements on the Moon and elsewhere. QGITS had the pleasure in speaking with Dave Dunlop about the panelists presenting on the Lunar Sub-Track.

QGITS: Last year’s lunar track was about lunar lava tube exploration on the moon, will there be any talks about them again this year?

Dave Dunlop: This year we are inviting a number of presentations involving the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. We will be getting updates about the Google Lunar XPRIZE (GLXP) competition and their recent Milestone awards to several teams from Dr. Andrew Barton, Chief Technology Officer of the GLXP. He will be presenting at the Lunar Track, Friday May 16th, in the afternoon. Google Lunar XPRIZE teams that will also be presenting at ISDC conference are: Moon Express, Penn State Lunar Lions, and Team Synergy Moon.

Although we devoted an entire day of our two day lunar track last year to lava tubes this year we have a more diverse range of topics and presentations. Last year we talked about lava tubes on the moon but there are also a number pits on the Mars shield volcanos that would seem to be evidence of underlying lava tubes there as well. Astrobotic is another GLXP team that is planning a future lunar lava tube mission. This continues to be a hot topic for exploration. To get something into the lunar lava tube is something that has never been tried before – it’s quite challenging. I hope they can pull that off.

google-lunar-xprize
The Google Lunar XPRIZE is going to be a reality show on Discovery and Science Channel in 2015.

QGITS: What will also be presented on the Lunar Sub-Track panel?

Dave Dunlop: Another aspect of the Lunar track this year includes a talk about lunar cycling orbits by Al Anzaldua of NSS Tucson; the development of lunar economy by Brad Blair an economic geologist and a couple of presentations on space radiation by Dr. Dennis Wright of Stanford Linear Accelerator and Dr. Doug Plata. Although it’s a Lunar track we are very pleased to have a special session on the Mercury Messenger mission by that outstanding team. So it’s a wider range of topics than last year and I hope that everyone who attends will find it both highly interesting and stimulating.

ISDC 2013

QGITS: What will you be speaking about at this year’s Lunar Sub-Track 2014?

Dave Dunlop: I am giving a talk on the International Lunar Geophysical Campaign. We are trying to do is to stimulate international interest in sending more small affordable science missions to the moon. At present only three countries have managed to soft land on the Moon. If you look at a number of missions that are being planned over the next 10 years, there’s quite a few. What I have counted amount about 24 missions in development right now. Mostly those come from major spacefaring powers like China, India, Japan, Canada and Russia. If you look at these missions, there only 8 countries out of the major G-20 economies. Why aren’t there more lunar missions coming from G-20 countries? Our campaign is trying to encourage the number of these affordable Lunar CubeSat scale missions and more nations to be engaged.

We hope for example that some of the GLXP teams that have not had the ability to raise enough capital or adequate time to meet the GLXP deadline can repurpose their efforts and subsequently find both national as well as private sponsors for lunar science missions. NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual network has a number of international nodes and I understand that some additional nations are also joining that network. Perhaps there can be some collaborative project that these initiatives can mutually develop. We could see a new paradigm of small scale affordable science missions undertaken by more countries than ever before as a result.

More Latest ISDC News & Updates: The National Space Society’s prestigious Robert A. Heinlein Memorial Award will be presented to Elon Musk at the 2014 International Space Development Conference (ISDC). The conference will run from May 14-18, 2014 in Los Angeles, Ca. The NSS has over 50 chapters around the world with conferences held in major cities and venues throughout the United States that covers several broad areas of study related to building a spacefaring civilization, including transportation to and through space, technology needed to live and work in space and Earth based activities to advocate for or educate others about space development.

space banner

Register Here

David Ruck Director & Producer of “I want to be an Astronaut” Film Screening at the National Space Conference | Countdown to ISDC 2014

David Ruck Director & Producer of “I want to be an Astronaut” Film Screening at the National Space Conference | Countdown to ISDC 2014

Apr 23, 2014

David J. Ruck is a photographer, filmmaker and educator, currently based in Maryland. David’s production company – Rubangfilms – specializes in emotive imaging: creating film, video, and photographic projects that inspire an emotional reaction from audiences. His latest production, “I want to be an Astronaut“, was premiered aboard the International Space Station and has been widely covered in the national media advocating for STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) educational programs. David will be screening his film this summer in the amphitheater of the Historic National Academy of Sciences Building to celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the American Astronautical Society, in Washington, DC. The film will also be featured at this year’s ISDC National Space Society conference in Los Angeles on Sunday, May 18. QGITS was thrilled to talk with David Ruck about his film documentary “I want to be an Astronaut” and the importance of having a space program.

David Ruck

QGITS: What inspired you to become a filmmaker and storyteller that highlights important issues like space?

David Ruck: I have been making films for about 14 years, I have never made anything like this one before but I was really inspired by hearing Neil DeGrasse Tyson on the Bill Maher show talking about NASA’s budget and how we spent more money bailing out the banks in 2008/2009 than we had in the 50 years in the space program. While I was not paying attention to space at the time, however; I knew that NASA was a source of inspiration for young people that wanted to be astronauts.  A contextual example of why you need to learn science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). So are we paving the way to be a nation that’s setting the bar high for our the future, serving the ultimate American dream, if you will, this idea of wanting to be an astronaut? If we don’t have a space program even capable of getting humans into space then have we completely lost that dream? I really wanted to know what the consequences of that would be on the everyday person. Through this journey identifying this young man, who not only wanted to be an astronaut since he was 3 but at 17 he really had a full body vision of wanting to remove humanity beyond earth for political, economic, social and cultural reasons. I found this kid who had this vision of why this important and I received more than what I bargained for and that’s when I felt what he was really up against because nothing inspires kids more like a vibrant space program. If we don’t have that then we are forfeiting not just our future in space but our economic future. I think the space program is a source of national pride an example of what the government can do when it’s doing its best and why the average citizen should be interested in space.

View the official trailer of “I want to be an Astronaut” documentary – The dream of one boy. The fate of one nation. Our future in space.

QGITS: What was it like documenting someone like 17 year old Blair?

David Ruck: Meeting Blair and following his First Robotics team – Chantilly Robotics Team 612 - really gave me hope. Teams at 15 and 16 years old build robots to help solve real world problems. I just didn’t even know these things were possible for them to do at this age or to even be working on – I think that’s a testament to the First Robotics program and other programs like it.  I saw the potential of our future and if these kids were given exciting opportunities down the road, then that just gave me a lot of hope. It also really frustrated me when I see that, in spite of the fact, there are clearly qualified individuals out there ready and willing to commit themselves for these challenges, yet we haven’t committed ourselves as a nation to making this a huge priority. That’s why I made this film and that’s why I have gone from being someone who wasn’t paying attention to space, into someone who now understands and appreciates the young people who want to pursue these things and what they are going to be offering us in the future. We need to pave the way for them to be successful.

QGITS: Anything else you would like to add?

David Ruck: Ultimately the goal of this film is to emphasize the importance of the space program, what the space program has done for us, and what it could do for us as a nation in the future if we decide to make space exploration a priority.

More Latest ISDC News & Updates: Three Nights, Three Days tells the story of how America’s second largest city came together in a uniting moment to shepard a national treasure through its often troubled streets. With only three Orbiters to allocate across the country, NASA supplied the Space Shuttle Endeavour to Los Angeles under the instruction that she be immediately placed on public display. Faced with the daunting challenge of squeezing a huge priceless object through nearly 13 miles of relatively narrow roads to the California Science Center, literally thousands of engineers, law enforcement representatives and volunteers pulled it off against considerable odds. Endeavour’s epic final journey, dubbed Mission 26, is chronicled in this as-yet-unreleased film which will be presented by producers Melissa Eccles and David Knight.

space banner

Register Here

NASA Space Exploration Track: Carl Schueler Satellite Remote Sensing System Architect & Engineer | Countdown to ISDC 2014

NASA Space Exploration Track: Carl Schueler Satellite Remote Sensing System Architect & Engineer | Countdown to ISDC 2014

Apr 15, 2014

Carl Schueler is a Satellite remote sensing system architect, EO sensor systems engineer and applications scientist, study and proposal lead. He received degrees in Physics & Astronomy at Louisiana State University, followed by two years at Hughes Aircraft Company teaching F-14 radar, Maverick missile theory and field repair. He earned a Ph.D. in Electrical & Computer Engineering at UC Santa Barbara in 1980 under a Howard Hughes Doctoral Fellowship. He is currently President at Schueler Consulting with clients that include LexerdTek, MEI Technologies, Orbital Sciences, and Cornell Technical Services. Carl is the Main Track Chair kicking off the first day of introductions for the NASA Exploration Track for the ISDC 2014 National Space Society conference coming up soon on May 14-18. QGITS had the pleasure of talking to Carl about the NASA 4 day track.

Carl Schueler

QGITS: The Nasa Exploration Track at the ISDC conference is a four day event that will cover four subtracks: 1) Asteroids; 2) Emerging Science & Technology; 3) Lunar; and 4) Space Exploration. Which track will you be speaking on?

Carl Schueler: We have a really packed schedule, well over 30 invited speakers who are all confirmed plus 4 students planning to present during the track in which I had the pleasure working with 5 Co-Chairs for the subtracks. The Asteroid sub-track is being managed by Dan Kwon from Orbital Sciences Corporation and the Lunar sub-track by David Dunlop, Saturday we have an all day science and technology sub-track by Samantha Infeld and Bill Gardiner and finally Sunday morning we have space exploration managed by Matt Ondler. My job was really made pretty easy and I am not giving a presentation. I will be introducing the 1st speaker of the track on Thursday morning and turning the rest to the sub-track leads; the work I have done has been stage manager/background. I’m just really pleased to be able to have done that relatively small contribution to the effort and be a part of it. I think it’s going to be a really exciting track. We’ve got people from NASA of course, JPL, NASA Headquarters, Johnson Space Center, the Associate Director of JPL talking about their space exploration program, and several talks on the NASA Asteroid Redirect Mission. I think that should be really interesting! We have a talk on DAWN, a mission launched in 2007 exploring a couple of the larger asteroids in the belt and presentations on extraction of materials from the asteroids, similar for lunar, and prospects for getting to the moon again, talks on space manufacturing, discussions on propulsion techniques and lots of other great topics.(View full agenda of scheduled speakers)

Nasa
Photo Credit: NASA Asteroid Redirect Mission images.

QGITS: What type of projects have you worked on?

Carl Schueler: This conference is sort of like the movie “Back to the Future” for me as I started out after I got my degree in Physics & Astronomy as an Astronomy Professor and Planetarium Director back in the early 70’s. Then got redirected into Engineering at Hughes Aircraft Company and remote sensing from space which involves looking down from earth orbit rather than out to space. I had to turn my back on space and look back at earth, spent 35 years doing development of earth remote sensing missions for NASA, that was great. I had a really good time with it, but this conference is an opportunity to get back to what I was doing many years in the past and find out what’s going on in space these days after having spent 35 years looking at earth from space.

QGITS: What are you most excited about the NASA Exploration Track?

Carl Schueler: I am just really pleased that we have been able to assemble a cast of excellent speakers every single day. This track I think is going to be really interesting – educational, entertaining, and inspirational: all three! I’m sure the conference overall is going to be great and there will be terrific speakers across the board so I am just really excited to be part of the entire effort and glad that I could participate.

About the National Space Society: The NSS has over 50 chapters around the world with conferences held in major cities and venues throughout the United States that covers several broad areas of study related to building a spacefaring civilization, including transportation to and through space, technology needed to live and work in space and Earth based activities to advocate for or educate others about space development. The ISDC is unique in that it brings together members of the general public with space activists, scientists, engineers, educators, astronauts, aerospace industry leaders, entrepreneurs, artists and government officials for one purpose: to explore humanity’s future in space.

space banner

Register Here